/photog

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“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”
Working towards that number changes the way you see the world. Living in this crowded-crumbling, sexy-scary, crazy-noisy, feast-of-vision city surely helps a bit. Keep your eyes peeled and trigger-finger ready.

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/literati

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“When I was your age television was called books!” Peter Faulk neatly sums up the written word’s apparent fall from grace. Yes, the telly has of late been dating smarter girls. But there’s more than one way to peel a couch potato. Turn it off and turn the page.

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/sound + vision

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“A film is more like music than like fiction.”
Indeed, they are birds of a feather– a murder of crows pecking away at yoga, politics and walks in the park to carve out a life of blurred vision, tinitus and narrow cultural vocabulary. That’s the way, uh huh, I like it.

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/ the daily muse

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Ok, Fine. Follow Me on Instagram :)

Yes, I’m late to the game. But better late than, well… whatever.

Instagram

  1. Thursday 11.14.2013 | 8:42 EDT

    シャネル バングル says:

    シャネル ネックレス コピー

Upstate State of Mind

A beautiful old farm house on 367 acres of rolling hills which have all the commodities from complete furniture to all the appliances and even a glass shower that you can get different Contractors to install. The persistent rain has finally let up, brightening the country landscape, but stilll having the right plumbing services from sites as http://www.thompsonfamilyplumbing.com for when the rain comes is important. We are in the old open barn, where a decaying baby grand sits in a dusty corner by the window. Kev plays, the five of us sing Joe Jackson only nominally off-key. A butterfly rouses, opens up to the window light…

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  1. Sunday 01.25.2015 | 7:48 EDT

    Nico says:

    J’adore ces quelques photos! Elles sentent bon le bonheur! :)

  2. Wednesday 04.23.2014 | 9:46 EDT

    Debleh says:

    Oh, how I’m itching to express how proud I am of you as I peruse your site! But that descriptor risks sounding condescending…. which is the diametric opposite emotion I’d like to convey. So instead, I’ll rip a page out of your once-upon-a-time, very old book and say, “Goddamn, were my 17 year old instincts impeccable when they lured you into being my first love!” In all seriousness, I am just thrilled that you’ve managed to pursue ALL your major passions – music, writing, photography – with such success in all. (I’m sure your other passions are equally as rewarding.) Everything on your page (and I’m just barely into it) brings such a big smile to my face as I see hints of the 19-20 year old you peeking out with each click. And of course, the fact that you are an ensconced Brooklynite is the cherry on the cake. :-)

    And Liana, I love your post! You were always an amazing mom – and Pat an amazing dad – so I hope you both take a bit of credit for the incredible guy who emerged from your home. I was crazy about both of you and will never forget Pat buying my first tank of gas when I got my first car :-) Hope you both are well!

  3. Monday 06.10.2013 | 2:25 EDT

    Liana Carey says:

    Wow, what can I say- he is my son.

The Go-Kartel Live @ Shrine, Harlem NY

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Posted by contributing editor Dick Starkey
b/w Photos by Rachel Carey, Snapseed processing by The Chairman
Color Photos courtesy of ShrineNYC 

In 2010, Brooklyn’s Hank’s Saloon hosted a shambling, lively set of songs by The Go-Kartel (Kevin Brady – guitar, vocals, “the dangler” accordion; Rob Grover – stoic yet jaunty bass, Bill Wyman-style; and Mauricio Carey – drums, boom, pah, pow!). The band rehearsed these songs for only seven years before unleashing them to an adoring and eclectic audience of both Manhattanites and Brooklynites. That’s mass appeal.

Last night, three years later, The Go-Kartel took the stage at Harlem’s Shrine World Music Venue, where Wednesday night is Rock Night. And Rock they did. The boisterous crowd was stunned to silence by the poppy opener “280-Z.” You could hear a pin drop. This was true, awestruck appreciation. But once the blistering “Carrie, I Don’t Mind” growled and cracked across the stage the crowd broke from their reverie into an applause wall of sound.

You like The Cure? Billy Bragg? Joe Jackson, Elvis Costello? Of course you do. Everybody does. And thusly, The Go-Kartel is liked by all. Composed of two dads and a rabble rouser, the trio brings Manhattan urbanity and Brooklyn credibility to a brand of pop that manages to be both fresh and nostalgic. And their taste in covers is simply superb. The band brings a wisp of the country to Elvis Costello’s rueful “Kid About It.” And on Burt Bacharach’s “Little Red Book,” they replicate the sound and spirit of a song that would ten years later serve as the template for The Cure’s “Killing an Arab.”

Towards the end of the set, fearless leader Brady tries to leave the audience wanting by cutting the set list down by one. But the road-wisened rhythm section bulldozed the idea in favor of one last bit of pure pop pleasure, the rousing and complex “Cannonball,” a song that took the band a mere 12 months to master. And with that last song, the audience was still left wanting. But I have a feeling we won’t have to wait three more years to get a chance to watch The Go-Kartel rock us out again…

The band has asked to thank sound man Lauren, along with the entire management staff of Shrine for their kind attention and all-pro back line.

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Mauricio Carey, Drums for The Go-Kartel

Mauricio Carey, Drums for The Go-Kartel

  1. Friday 04.19.2013 | 8:22 EDT

    littlesilvererika says:

    Such great shots! Wish I’d seen it and can’t believe I missed this one opportunity to hear my three great friends put on a SHOW. I will be at the next one NO MATTER WHAT.

Been Looking So Long At These
Pictures of You


most images © Albert Cheung Photography www.albertcheungphoto.com

 

Dear friends and loved ones:

Our wedding pictures are done, and by asking you to take a look, we’re not appealing to our sense of vanity, but rather yours. Albert got some great coverage – all of you are represented and you look fabulous! So take a minute to re-live the day by looking out for the ones that made this event so special: yourselves.

much love

mau + rach

  1. Monday 01.12.2015 | 4:06 EDT

    David Hudson says:

    Great to see you after all these years. Your wife is beautiful. Let me know if you’re ever in Atlanta.

  2. Thursday 04.24.2014 | 10:28 EDT

    Julie says:

    Well shit little ol’ man… congrats! Didn’t know. You two look swell together and might I add quite happy. Good for you!

  3. Sunday 06.02.2013 | 11:46 EDT

    lindsey says:

    Hello! This is my first comment here so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and tell you I truly enjoy reading through your blog posts. Can you recommend any other blogs/websites/forums that cover the same topics? Thanks a lot!

  4. Sunday 04.14.2013 | 11:49 EDT

    deane says:

    We all look at those pictures of ourselves a little longer… lets be honest, but vanity aside these are wonderful shots and a nice reminder of a great day!

Mau + Rach: Bye Bye Brooklyn, Aloha Hawaii, Part 2 – Makena/Hana

So we’ve switched gears from lazy lounge lizards to active island go-getters. We’ve migrated south from Lahaina to Makena, where we’ve kicked into high gear with our Sweet Blue Ride, a convertible Mustang that’s taken us far and wide across the island. Rachel’s swam with the sea turtles, we’ve sailed the deep blue seas, watched whales fly high above the water line, and twisted and turned along the Road to Hana, from it’s mundane beginning to it’s dramatic end. It’s been quite a ride. Take a look…

BTW, along the Road to Hana, we stopped at Waianapanapa, (say that one time fast) to witness a lava blowhole. Don’t snicker. It’s badass:

Mau + Rach: Bye Bye Brooklyn, Aloha Hawaii – Part 1: Lahaina

 

“Down By the Shack, By the Sea” | Don Ho | Greatest Hits | 1975

After what must be described, in our humble opinion, as the perfect wedding, Rach and I high-tailed it out of the cold, grey environs of Brooklyn for the breezy, sunny delights of Maui, Hawaii. We left at 5:30AM the morning after the ceremony and arrived 21 hours later, tired and wired, but walking on air.

Our first stop was Lahaina, where we spent four days with a single agenda – lie by the ocean while friendly resort staff keep the snacks but no alcohol, since she has recovered from alcoholism in a rehab new jersey just recently.

Last night we visited a bar owned by one of my heros, Mick Fleetwood. Locals assert that he often spends time at his beloved Fleetwood’s, a place peppered with photos of the venerable Fleetwood Mac drummer, alongside other famous, charismatic friends. One of his original (gold-plated) drum kits is on display as well, though it is said he occasionally sits behind them to the delight of his fans. I hoped I could angle myself into a photo with the incredibly tall, marvelously whiskered drummer of my eye, but alas, he was not present, what with Fleetwood Mac on tour and all.

Our most ambitious outing was a simple catamaran cruise at sunset, where we watched whales playfully splash around us as we sipped drinks and snapped pics. Truly amazing, these behemoth, benevolent creatures.

Tomorrow we head for Makena. Here we will begin the active part of the trip, where kayaking, snorkeling, sea turtles, helicopter rides, a convertible Mustang and the legendary Road to Hana await us. Stay tuned…

  1. Thursday 02.18.2016 | 3:00 EDT

    艾可力魔力净 says:

    非洲艾可力魔力净

  2. Tuesday 04.02.2013 | 11:32 EDT

    miles says:

    What a paradise! Do they have a lot of bagpipers in Hawaii?

  3. Thursday 03.28.2013 | 8:53 EDT

    KPH says:

    Please wear the wife beater more often. It suits you. That and you have a wife now, so… yeah.

    1. Thursday 03.28.2013 | 1:14 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      You are a funny, funny man. The wife beater is my go-to top of the season. My wife loves it. The top, that is…

#1 Record

The Beatles - The White Album

 

Yesterday, Knight reiterated a question posed by friend on Facebook, asking people: “What single record should every serious music fan own?”

It’s a tricky query – the answer could depend on your interpretation of the question. But as I see it, we’re not talking about a “desert island” kind of choice, one that is informed by one’s personal tastes and experiences. Rather I look at it as a choice that reflects the impact and influence the record in question has had on (rock) music as a whole. If this is how we approach the challenging task of selecting that one record, it seems the choice is rather easy:

The Beatles White Album.

“Helter Skelter” | The Beatles | The White Album | 1968

Breaking down the rationale, first we could likely all agree that The Beatles are by far the most influential band in rock history. Fans of the band are, well, fanatical. Countless artists cite them as an influence. And though The Fab Four’s contributions to songwriting, topical material, production, and style are legendary, we can’t overlook the influence they had on future musicians that, regardless of their stylistic inclinations, looked at those four boys performing and said simply: “I want to do that.”

Now I must admit, my gut reaction choice was Sgt. Pepper’s. It broke new ground on so many levels. No other record before it sounded like it, thanks to George Martin’s production wizardry. It heralded a new era of sound that reached far beyond the psychedelic arena, as artists began to mine the wealth of textures and spaces created by this mother-of-all-rock-records. It also introduced an entirely new approach to topical songwriting, as evidenced by the ripped from the headlines approach of “Day In the Life” or “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite.” So much more could be said about the seminal quality of this record, but as it pertains to the topic at hand, this is a subject to be explored in later posts.

The White Album. Why this record in particular? My choice stems from the stylistic eclecticism of the song selections. This record was made at time when the band was beginning to show signs of cracking. Tensions were high. The fierce competition and one-upmanship between Lennon and McCartney that previously fueled a collaborative songwriting partnership began to implode. No longer was this competition a spark towards collaborative creativity. It instead gave way to a splintering between songwriters and created an atmosphere of individual rather than collaborative output.

For this reason, the White Album is a schizophrenic record, so stylistically varied as to present what seems at first listen to be a disjointed collection of songs written in a vacuum. It’s almost as if the four members had made solo records and at the last minute decided to release them as one behemoth collection of individual creativity. But with repeated listenings, one can reconcile and appreciate it’s stylistic variety by virtue of its remarkable scope. We’ve got arguably the first heavy metal song (“Helter Skelter”) playing alongside the western balladry of “Rocky Raccoon”; the plaintive psychedelia of “Dear Prudence” going head to head with the weird and edgy “Happiness is a Warm Gun”; and terribly sad songs of loss such as “Julia” next to the joyful reverie of “Birthday” and “Back in the U.S.S.R.”  The variety of structure, style and arrangement is dizzying. It’s a challenging record, one that requires the listener to put aside expectations of continuity and learn to regard it as a musical menagerie never topped before or since.

So how does this sit with you, dear reader? What would you choose? Let the debate continue…

Beatles White Album Portraits on Maunet

  1. Sunday 07.14.2013 | 5:35 EDT

    Robert dene says:

    John Lennon said that Ticket To Ride was the first heavy metal song…

  2. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:28 EDT

    KPH says:

    I was gonna say Zeppelin II.

    1. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:32 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      funny you should mention it. As an offshoot to this conversation, Knight and I today discussed which Zeppelin album was the best. I was torn between II and Houses of the Holy. I eventually landed on HotH – this was the record where they abandoned blatant nods to the blues structure and offered a collection of songs that were entirely new and fresh.

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