/photog

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“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.”
Working towards that number changes the way you see the world. Living in this crowded-crumbling, sexy-scary, crazy-noisy, feast-of-vision city surely helps a bit. Keep your eyes peeled and trigger-finger ready.

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/literati

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“When I was your age television was called books!” Peter Faulk neatly sums up the written word’s apparent fall from grace. Yes, the telly has of late been dating smarter girls. But there’s more than one way to peel a couch potato. Turn it off and turn the page.

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/sound + vision

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“A film is more like music than like fiction.”
Indeed, they are birds of a feather– a murder of crows pecking away at yoga, politics and walks in the park to carve out a life of blurred vision, tinitus and narrow cultural vocabulary. That’s the way, uh huh, I like it.

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/ the daily muse

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Been Looking So Long At These
Pictures of You


most images © Albert Cheung Photography www.albertcheungphoto.com

 

Dear friends and loved ones:

Our wedding pictures are done, and by asking you to take a look, we’re not appealing to our sense of vanity, but rather yours. Albert got some great coverage – all of you are represented and you look fabulous! So take a minute to re-live the day by looking out for the ones that made this event so special: yourselves.

much love

mau + rach

  1. Monday 01.12.2015 | 4:06 EDT

    David Hudson says:

    Great to see you after all these years. Your wife is beautiful. Let me know if you’re ever in Atlanta.

  2. Thursday 04.24.2014 | 10:28 EDT

    Julie says:

    Well shit little ol’ man… congrats! Didn’t know. You two look swell together and might I add quite happy. Good for you!

  3. Sunday 06.02.2013 | 11:46 EDT

    lindsey says:

    Hello! This is my first comment here so I just wanted to give a quick shout out and tell you I truly enjoy reading through your blog posts. Can you recommend any other blogs/websites/forums that cover the same topics? Thanks a lot!

  4. Sunday 04.14.2013 | 11:49 EDT

    deane says:

    We all look at those pictures of ourselves a little longer… lets be honest, but vanity aside these are wonderful shots and a nice reminder of a great day!

Mau + Rach: Bye Bye Brooklyn, Aloha Hawaii, Part 2 – Makena/Hana

So we’ve switched gears from lazy lounge lizards to active island go-getters. We’ve migrated south from Lahaina to Makena, where we’ve kicked into high gear with our Sweet Blue Ride, a convertible Mustang that’s taken us far and wide across the island. Rachel’s swam with the sea turtles, we’ve sailed the deep blue seas, watched whales fly high above the water line, and twisted and turned along the Road to Hana, from it’s mundane beginning to it’s dramatic end. It’s been quite a ride. Take a look…

BTW, along the Road to Hana, we stopped at Waianapanapa, (say that one time fast) to witness a lava blowhole. Don’t snicker. It’s badass:

Mau + Rach: Bye Bye Brooklyn, Aloha Hawaii – Part 1: Lahaina

 

“Down By the Shack, By the Sea” | Don Ho | Greatest Hits | 1975

After what must be described, in our humble opinion, as the perfect wedding, Rach and I high-tailed it out of the cold, grey environs of Brooklyn for the breezy, sunny delights of Maui, Hawaii. We left at 5:30AM the morning after the ceremony and arrived 21 hours later, tired and wired, but walking on air.

Our first stop was Lahaina, where we spent four days with a single agenda – lie by the ocean while friendly resort staff keep the snacks and alcohol comin’.

Last night we visited a bar owned by one of my heros, Mick Fleetwood. Locals assert that he often spends time at his beloved Fleetwood’s, a place peppered with photos of the venerable Fleetwood Mac drummer, alongside other famous, charismatic friends. One of his original (gold-plated) drum kits is on display as well, though it is said he occasionally sits behind them to the delight of his fans. I hoped I could angle myself into a photo with the incredibly tall, marvelously whiskered drummer of my eye, but alas, he was not present, what with Fleetwood Mac on tour and all.

Our most ambitious outing was a simple catamaran cruise at sunset, where we watched whales playfully splash around us as we sipped drinks and snapped pics. Truly amazing, these behemoth, benevolent creatures.

Tomorrow we head for Makena. Here we will begin the active part of the trip, where kayaking, snorkeling, sea turtles, helicopter rides, a convertible Mustang and the legendary Road to Hana await us. Stay tuned…

  1. Thursday 02.18.2016 | 3:00 EDT

    艾可力魔力净 says:

    非洲艾可力魔力净

  2. Tuesday 04.02.2013 | 11:32 EDT

    miles says:

    What a paradise! Do they have a lot of bagpipers in Hawaii?

  3. Thursday 03.28.2013 | 8:53 EDT

    KPH says:

    Please wear the wife beater more often. It suits you. That and you have a wife now, so… yeah.

    1. Thursday 03.28.2013 | 1:14 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      You are a funny, funny man. The wife beater is my go-to top of the season. My wife loves it. The top, that is…

#1 Record

The Beatles - The White Album

 

Yesterday, Knight reiterated a question posed by friend on Facebook, asking people: “What single record should every serious music fan own?”

It’s a tricky query – the answer could depend on your interpretation of the question. But as I see it, we’re not talking about a “desert island” kind of choice, one that is informed by one’s personal tastes and experiences. Rather I look at it as a choice that reflects the impact and influence the record in question has had on (rock) music as a whole. If this is how we approach the challenging task of selecting that one record, it seems the choice is rather easy:

The Beatles White Album.

“Helter Skelter” | The Beatles | The White Album | 1968

Breaking down the rationale, first we could likely all agree that The Beatles are by far the most influential band in rock history. Fans of the band are, well, fanatical. Countless artists cite them as an influence. And though The Fab Four’s contributions to songwriting, topical material, production, and style are legendary, we can’t overlook the influence they had on future musicians that, regardless of their stylistic inclinations, looked at those four boys performing and said simply: “I want to do that.”

Now I must admit, my gut reaction choice was Sgt. Pepper’s. It broke new ground on so many levels. No other record before it sounded like it, thanks to George Martin’s production wizardry. It heralded a new era of sound that reached far beyond the psychedelic arena, as artists began to mine the wealth of textures and spaces created by this mother-of-all-rock-records. It also introduced an entirely new approach to topical songwriting, as evidenced by the ripped from the headlines approach of “Day In the Life” or “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite.” So much more could be said about the seminal quality of this record, but as it pertains to the topic at hand, this is a subject to be explored in later posts.

The White Album. Why this record in particular? My choice stems from the stylistic eclecticism of the song selections. This record was made at time when the band was beginning to show signs of cracking. Tensions were high. The fierce competition and one-upmanship between Lennon and McCartney that previously fueled a collaborative songwriting partnership began to implode. No longer was this competition a spark towards collaborative creativity. It instead gave way to a splintering between songwriters and created an atmosphere of individual rather than collaborative output.

For this reason, the White Album is a schizophrenic record, so stylistically varied as to present what seems at first listen to be a disjointed collection of songs written in a vacuum. It’s almost as if the four members had made solo records and at the last minute decided to release them as one behemoth collection of individual creativity. But with repeated listenings, one can reconcile and appreciate it’s stylistic variety by virtue of its remarkable scope. We’ve got arguably the first heavy metal song (“Helter Skelter”) playing alongside the western balladry of “Rocky Raccoon”; the plaintive psychedelia of “Dear Prudence” going head to head with the weird and edgy “Happiness is a Warm Gun”; and terribly sad songs of loss such as “Julia” next to the joyful reverie of “Birthday” and “Back in the U.S.S.R.”  The variety of structure, style and arrangement is dizzying. It’s a challenging record, one that requires the listener to put aside expectations of continuity and learn to regard it as a musical menagerie never topped before or since.

So how does this sit with you, dear reader? What would you choose? Let the debate continue…

Beatles White Album Portraits on Maunet

  1. Sunday 07.14.2013 | 5:35 EDT

    Robert dene says:

    John Lennon said that Ticket To Ride was the first heavy metal song…

  2. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:28 EDT

    KPH says:

    I was gonna say Zeppelin II.

    1. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:32 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      funny you should mention it. As an offshoot to this conversation, Knight and I today discussed which Zeppelin album was the best. I was torn between II and Houses of the Holy. I eventually landed on HotH – this was the record where they abandoned blatant nods to the blues structure and offered a collection of songs that were entirely new and fresh.

Vinyl Addiction by the Numbers:
Or, How to Kill a Chilly Saturday Afternoon

Vinyl Count Distribution Chart

 

Music geeks are obsessive catalogers. Their enjoyment of music is not limited to the recording itself, but to the metadata associated with one’s collection. The digital age makes that data readily accessible (if the geek is obsessive enough to tag his tracks with complete, accurate information). Digital music libraries like iTunes allow one to quickly glimpse a variety of data sets that heighten musical enjoyment. How many albums do I own? How many artists represent that number? What year did a particular album come out? Numbers give the music geek both a road map to his/her collection and a sense of the historical perspective the collection represents.

I am a music geek. I revel in the huge collection of music I’ve amassed over the past 30 years. And, with the help of iTunes, I routinely sort, filter and catalogue my collection by almost any criteria I could want. I can quickly refine my choices to find just the right record to listen to for any given mood or occasion. But on Feb 7, 2011 something happened that put a virtual stop to my digital musical consumption. I caught the vinyl bug.

vinyl

I purchased a Pro-ject Debut III Turntable and, with the fervor of a fanatic, began acquiring used, new and re-issued vinyl by the scores. Week after week, empty LP cartons stacked up outside my door while upstairs in my office the number of precious pieces of finely-grooved plastic grew at an alarming rate. I was hooked.

But my obsession eventually ran beyond just the consumption of vinyl. I jonesed for the metadata, you see. How many records had I acquired in the past 2 years? Where was my road map? I began toying with the idea of arranging my collection by decade (genre being a category that is too often blurry and subjective). This would give me at least one precious piece of information that could help me in selecting what to listen to when I was in the mood for, say, romantic pop with a penchant for keyboards. To the 80′s bin, Robin! And I began to wonder: Hmmm… how well is each decade represented by my collection?

I mentioned this whimsical musing to Rachel on several occasions. Each time, my extremely good-tempered wife-to-be answered with a cringing retort: I am not spending hours helping you shuffle pieces of vinyl around your office. And besides, I’ll never be able to find anything! So I gave up the dream. For the moment. Until one morning, as we lay in bed on a cold Brooklyn Saturday morning, I mentioned my irrepressible desire once again. This time, she formulated an interesting alternative: Why don’t you instead create an index of all your records, listed by decade? Brilliant! Create my own set of metadata the old fashioned way. By hand. Sort of. Will you help me, I pleaded? I was excited by the idea for reasons beyond anything a rational middle-aged man should ponder. But, with an air of peculiar excitement of her own, Rachel agreed to help. You see, she’s a geek too. A spreadsheet geek.

We hopped out of the warm bed, made some strong coffee and blew off the household chores of laundry and grocery shopping. Instead, Rachel took her position behind the Mac, nimble fingers at the ready, as I knelt beside one of the eight bins of vinyl scattered and stacked around the office. One by one, I pulled each record from it’s alphabetical position and dictated artist, album title and year to my lovely and patient geek at arms. It seemed a formidable task. But we flew through it. In less than 4 hours, we’d created a spreadsheet of all 456 records in my collection. Ah, that number. So satisfying. So frightening in it’s size-to-time ratio. But once the data was properly sorted, the real value of it (to me at least) shone through. I knew exactly how many records I had from each decade since 1920.

I had speculated on the spread as we endeavored in this somewhat ridiculous task. At the end of the day, my speculations proved correct. I am a child of the 80′s. My collection confirmed this. I had by far more records from that decade than any other, followed closely by the 1970′s. The 90′s (the decade dominated by the CD format) were the most anemically represented –  many titles were simply not pressed on vinyl during that time. And while the 2010′s represented only 7% of my collection, we are merely two years in to the decade. At the current average rate of growth of 15 records per year, I will theoretically have collected 150 by decade’s end!

Many will exclaim: What a colossal waste of time! And they may be right. But for reasons incomprehensible to the non-geek, it was a great way to kill a cold winter day. Rachel confirms it. This is a truly satisfying collection of data.

View the discography spreadsheet here.

Some have asked, what are the top ten artists in this vinyl collection? We are here to serve:

  1. The Rolling Stones: 21
  2. The Beatles: 18 
  3. Bob Dylan: 13
  4. Rush: 9
  5. Elvis Costello: 8
  6. Lou Reed: 8
  7. U2: 8
  8. Belle & Sebastian: 7
  9. The National: 7
  10. The Smiths: 7

For more interesting (?) statistics on digital music play count, visit my LastFM chart page.

vinyl-smiths

vinyl-stones

vinyl-orofon

vinyl-national

vinyl-national-2

  1. Wednesday 03.20.2013 | 12:12 EDT

    ultravioletray says:

    Nice! We have our vinyl collection organized by year, and use Discogs for indexing, though methinks yr spreadsheet might be easier to customize listings for more detailed stats.

    +1 for at least one Gordon Lightfoot LP in collection.

    +1 for Hatful of Hollow on vinyl.

    (Sticky Fingers with zipper is obvious +1, but then, I just gave it one).

  2. Friday 03.15.2013 | 10:33 EDT

    mpowers says:

    A compulsive activity near and dear to my heart.

    Quick suggestion.

    Don’t anticipate that your wife will appreciate your expert weighted index based on the “bands for mans” versus “bands for womans” as much as you do.

  3. Tuesday 02.05.2013 | 1:29 EDT

    benproof says:

    Rush. Ughh. That being said,..I’m glad you guys enjoyed geeking out together. The couple that geeks together,…well,..you get it.

  4. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:47 EDT

    rachel says:

    At least Led Zeppelin didn’t make the top 10. Then we’d have some reckoning to do.

    1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:49 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      They’re in the top 15

      1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:52 EDT

        rachel says:

        Don’t test my goodwill. And thank GOD you don’t have any Gordon Lightfoot on vinyl!

        1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 2:00 EDT

          chairmanmau says:

          Touché, my dear. Touché.

          1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 7:23 EDT

            KBJr says:

            But…’If You Could Read My Mind’ ‘Sundown’ and ‘The Wreck of the Sigmund Fitzgerard’ are fantastic vinyl songs!

  5. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:06 EDT

    KBJr says:

    The biggest surprise to me? More Rush records than Elvis Costello. Well-writ, and great pics!

    1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:19 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      Yes, we’ll have to remedy that. Let’s recall this collection goes back to well before high school. Wait a minute. What am i apologizing for. Rush Rules!

Gin and Gaudi: Barcelona, Spain 2012


All photos © maunet.com. Shot with the Nikon D300S and the iPhone 4s + SnapSeed

Hola chicos, today we’re gonna show and tell a bit about the amazing city of Barcelona, home to the great kooky architect Gaudi, mouth-watering Iberian ham, charmingly lisped accents and the strangely mixed gin and tonic. Rach and I spent six days traipsing around this beautiful city, taking in an abundance of architecture, shopping, eating and drinking. We slept little and walked much, making our way through most of the city’s barrios, each more charming than the next.

With jet-lag buzzing in my ears as I write  this, it’s hard to sum up our stay in a few short words, so I’ll spare you all the clever prose and let the pictures speak for themselves. Yes, it’s a hefty slideshow, but well worth your gander, if I do say so myself. Enjoy!

Start the slideshow…

  1. Thursday 09.27.2012 | 3:11 EDT

    Michele says:

    Ah, thank you for the visual tour of that stunning city! So many the architectural and culinary delights to enjoy…

  2. Monday 09.24.2012 | 8:52 EDT

    Tara says:

    These are incredibly beautiful photographs! I was blown away…

Found Art: Dylan Day Happenstance

Bob Sylan's Nashville Skyline Sidewalk ArtiPhone 4GS + Snapseed, © maunet.com

As happens every couple of years, I’m back on a Dylan kick. Yesterday I spent the better half of a slow work day listening to a shuffle of 38 records as I waited patiently for UPS to deliver my newest vinyl acquisition, a 180-gram copy of Dylan’s 1968′s country-rock classic, John Wesley Harding.

Around lunch time, over a shredded chicken and chipotle mayonnaise sandwich, I popped in the DVD extras to the fascinating pseudo biopic I’m Not There and listened to Todd Haynes explain his brilliant approach to accounting for the life of a man as confounding as he is remarkable. Soon thereafter, the UPS man rang my bell to deliver the aforementioned piece of vinyl. Score. I placed it on the turntable and cranked it up.

At the close of business I readied myself for a trip to the city, iPod strapped and queued to a mobile shuffle of the bard’s sizable discography. MetroCard in hand, “Tombstone Blues” in my ears, I walked down the subway stars to the F train. Looking down I found this – good old Bob, a rare Nashville Skyline smile on his face as he tipped his hat to me from the concrete filth of the subway stairs. Hi Bob, nice hat!

In honor of this happy little happenstance, here’s Nashville Skyline’s “Peggy Day” for your own little Dylan fix. While you’re listening, I’ll be waiting for yet another Dylan delivery, this time a copy of Clinton Heylin’s celebrated 800-page tome, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades. When it comes to Robert Zimmerman, hey, there’s no end to what you may learn about the man…

“Peggy Day” | Bob Dylan | Nashville Skyline | 1969

  1. Wednesday 04.18.2012 | 1:47 EDT

    melania says:

    He is astonishingly amazing. I LOVE him and consider him the greatest musical genius besides the classical composers. It’s funny to hear this song, he is rather kermit like but it works. Time Out of Mind was my intro to him and then I worked my way back. How much more heartbreaking yet inspiring can you get? “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” gets me every single time. If you haven’t, catch him live. He is beyond cool.

  2. Wednesday 04.18.2012 | 12:59 EDT

    Tonna says:

    So glad you got your groove back. XXOO

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