/ sound + vision:

“a film is more like music than like fiction.” —Stanley Kubrik

/ may 2017

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Music Industrial Index: Red November EP Available Now

 

Hi musical friends, it’s been a while since the last update, but the family has been hella busy the past two months, bidding many joyful/tearful goodbyes to Brooklyn and beginning to populate our calendar in Atlanta with work, music and social encounters. So my latest musical endeavors are a sort of farewell to BKLYN and a big howdy to ATL.

As some of you may know, for the past two years I’ve been learning and honing new skills in music composition, production and DAW under the moniker Music Industrial Index. The product of that progress is the Red November EP. Although I arranged and produced the record, this time around it is not a one-man show, as I was lucky to collaborate on two tracks with dear friends and members of perennial The Go-Kartel, Rob Grover and Kevin Brady. Rachel Carey has made her way into the mix by way of lead and backing vocals, with lovely results.

The 5-track recording consists of three vocal numbers and two instrumental ambient pieces arranged and produced by yours truly. Both the title track and “Christopher’s Sister” were co-written by Rob Grover and myself, featuring Kevin Brady and Rachel Carey on lead and backing vocal. The third vocal track is an interpretation of Kate Bush’s Running Up that Hill, featuring lead vocals by Mauricio Carey (gulp!) and Rachel again on backing vox. On this particular track I stretched myself perhaps beyond my capabilities – I am no singer (so be kind :). But recording and producing my own vocal tracks  allowed me to get a sense of how to build vocal tracks in a home studio, and, ultimately, learn the tools available that enabled me to occasionally cheat my way into tunefulness :)

It’s been extremely rewarding to have had the opportunity to remotely make music with close friends and family, now that all involved have spread out across the globe, with Rob in Frankfurt, Germany, the Careys freshly settled in Atlanta, Georgia and Kevin remaining in New York City where he continues to command admiration and respect in both advertising and music-making. I miss these boys dearly but grateful for the technology that allows us to continue to make music together in some fashion.

Hope you enjoy!

cheers
mau

side a
RED NOVEMBER / CHRISTOPHER’S SISTER /RUNNING UP THAT HILL

side b
ANOTHER BLUE WORLD / ENO-LAMENTI

RED NOVEMBER written by Robert Grover and Mauricio Carey
lead vocal: Kevin Brady
backing vocals: Rachel Carey, Kevin Brady, and Mauricio Carey

CHRISTOPHER’S SISTER written by Robert Grover and Mauricio Carey
lead vocal: Robert Grover
backing vocal: Rachel Carey

RUNNING UP THAT HILL written by Kate Bush; copyright © 1985 by Kate Bush Music Publishing Ltd.
lead and backing vocals: Mauricio Carey and Rachel Carey

all other tracks written by Mauricio Carey
mastered by Justin Colletti at Joe Lambert Mastering
cover art by Mauricio Carey at c23creative.com

recorded, arranged, and produced by Mauricio Carey in the office/bedroom, Brooklyn, NY, 2016–17, except “Red November” and “Christopher’s Sister,” recorded at the kitchen table, Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and in the office/bedroom, Brooklyn, NY, 2017

special thanks to Joe Lambert, Justin Colletti and Diana Zinni at Joe Lambert Mastering and to Knight Berman, Kevin Brady and Rachel Carey for their generous contributions to this record.

/ nov 2014

The Go-Kartel’s “Away” EP Available Now!

The Go-Kartel Away EP

As some of you may well know, TGK has been working on their debut recording since March of this year. Sixteen studio days spread out over eight months. That’s about as fast as three 40-something dads (actual or expecting) can move these days, but we have at last crossed the finish line.

We are very proud to announce the release of the “Away” EP: 22 minutes of first-rate power-pop. It is currently available on iTunes, GooglePlay, Amazon and Spotify, with more digital retailers being added over the next few days. We hope you enjoy it!

Cheers!

Kevin, Rob and Mauricio, a.k.a TGK

Listen here:

Download “Away” on iTunes

Find Us on Spotify

 

 

Download on Bandcamp

Many thanks to Rachel, Tal, Mareike, Quinn and Leni for their keen ears, undying patience and loving support. 

Credits:

The Go-Kartel is:
Kevin Brady: vocals, guitar, accordion, keyboards
Mauricio Carey: drums, percussion
Robert Grover: bass guitar

Words by Kevin Brady
Music by The Go-Kartel

Produced by The Go-Kartel
Engineered by Dave Hollinghurst

Recorded March – September 2014 at Sunset7 Studio, Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Background vocals on “Away” recorded by Dave Robertson at Dangly Studios, Williamsburg, Brooklyn
Lead vocals on “Cannonball” recorded by Brian Goodheart at Sonic Union Studios, New York, NY

Mixed by The Go-Kartel w/ Dave Hollinghurst
Mastered by Joe Lambert at JLM Sound, Brooklyn, NY

Dave Hollinghurst plays 12-string guitar on “This”
Ben Curtis plays additional guitars on “If He Ever Breaks,” “280-Z” and ”Close Your Eyes”
Steve Curtis and Erika Simonian sing backing vocals on “Cannonball” | littlesilvermusic.com

Art Direction by The Go-Kartel
Cover photo and sleeve design by Mauricio Carey for c23 | c23creative.com

© 2014 The Go-Kartel

facebook.com/thego-kartel
Instagram #tgk #thegokartel

“Away” is also available at these fine digital retailers:

 

 

The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions The Go-Kartel Sunset Sessions

The Go-Kartel Rocks the Shop

Thank you all for coming out to Rock Shop last night. We had a blast and hope you did too!

Many thanks to Little Silver for putting the show together and to Steve Shiffman & The Land of No for bringing Guitar God caliber Rock to us all.

  1. Friday 07.25.2014 | 8:47 EDT

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  2. Friday 11.22.2013 | 3:16 EDT

    Todd says:

    You guys sound great, wish I could’ve been there!

/ oct 2013

The Go-Kartel Live@Rock Shop | Bklyn

The Go-Kartel, Live @ Rock Shop, Nov 21 2013

They’re back, and they’ve brought friends.

Or rather, they are riding on the coat tails of  friends.

Little Silver has put together a great show at Rock Shop in Brooklyn that will include Steve Shiffman & The Land of No along with the world-renowned Go-Kartel. So come on out, enjoy a few cocktails on the rooftop deck then join us for a night of rock you’ll never forget. For a while.

Thursday, Nov 21, 2013

Advance Tickets: 8$
At the Door: $10

Set times:

8:00 The Go-Kartel
9:00 Little Silver
10:00 Steve Shiffman & The Land of No

249 4th Ave between Union + Garfield, Bklyn 11215

/ apr 2013

The Go-Kartel Live @ Shrine, Harlem NY

00maunet-The-Go-Kartel-Live-Shrine-Harlem
Posted by contributing editor Dick Starkey
b/w Photos by Rachel Carey, Snapseed processing by The Chairman
Color Photos courtesy of ShrineNYC 

In 2010, Brooklyn’s Hank’s Saloon hosted a shambling, lively set of songs by The Go-Kartel (Kevin Brady – guitar, vocals, “the dangler” accordion; Rob Grover – stoic yet jaunty bass, Bill Wyman-style; and Mauricio Carey – drums, boom, pah, pow!). The band rehearsed these songs for only seven years before unleashing them to an adoring and eclectic audience of both Manhattanites and Brooklynites. That’s mass appeal.

Last night, three years later, The Go-Kartel took the stage at Harlem’s Shrine World Music Venue, where Wednesday night is Rock Night. And Rock they did. The boisterous crowd was stunned to silence by the poppy opener “280-Z.” You could hear a pin drop. This was true, awestruck appreciation. But once the blistering “Carrie, I Don’t Mind” growled and cracked across the stage the crowd broke from their reverie into an applause wall of sound.

You like The Cure? Billy Bragg? Joe Jackson, Elvis Costello? Of course you do. Everybody does. And thusly, The Go-Kartel is liked by all. Composed of two dads and a rabble rouser, the trio brings Manhattan urbanity and Brooklyn credibility to a brand of pop that manages to be both fresh and nostalgic. And their taste in covers is simply superb. The band brings a wisp of the country to Elvis Costello’s rueful “Kid About It.” And on Burt Bacharach’s “Little Red Book,” they replicate the sound and spirit of a song that would ten years later serve as the template for The Cure’s “Killing an Arab.”

Towards the end of the set, fearless leader Brady tries to leave the audience wanting by cutting the set list down by one. But the road-wisened rhythm section bulldozed the idea in favor of one last bit of pure pop pleasure, the rousing and complex “Cannonball,” a song that took the band a mere 12 months to master. And with that last song, the audience was still left wanting. But I have a feeling we won’t have to wait three more years to get a chance to watch The Go-Kartel rock us out again…

The band has asked to thank sound man Lauren, along with the entire management staff of Shrine for their kind attention and all-pro back line.

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Mauricio Carey, Drums for The Go-Kartel

Mauricio Carey, Drums for The Go-Kartel

  1. Friday 04.19.2013 | 8:22 EDT

    littlesilvererika says:

    Such great shots! Wish I’d seen it and can’t believe I missed this one opportunity to hear my three great friends put on a SHOW. I will be at the next one NO MATTER WHAT.

/ mar 2013

#1 Record

The Beatles - The White Album

 

Yesterday, Knight reiterated a question posed by friend on Facebook, asking people: “What single record should every serious music fan own?”

It’s a tricky query – the answer could depend on your interpretation of the question. But as I see it, we’re not talking about a “desert island” kind of choice, one that is informed by one’s personal tastes and experiences. Rather I look at it as a choice that reflects the impact and influence the record in question has had on (rock) music as a whole. If this is how we approach the challenging task of selecting that one record, it seems the choice is rather easy:

The Beatles White Album.

“Helter Skelter” | The Beatles | The White Album | 1968

Breaking down the rationale, first we could likely all agree that The Beatles are by far the most influential band in rock history. Fans of the band are, well, fanatical. Countless artists cite them as an influence. And though The Fab Four’s contributions to songwriting, topical material, production, and style are legendary, we can’t overlook the influence they had on future musicians that, regardless of their stylistic inclinations, looked at those four boys performing and said simply: “I want to do that.”

Now I must admit, my gut reaction choice was Sgt. Pepper’s. It broke new ground on so many levels. No other record before it sounded like it, thanks to George Martin’s production wizardry. It heralded a new era of sound that reached far beyond the psychedelic arena, as artists began to mine the wealth of textures and spaces created by this mother-of-all-rock-records. It also introduced an entirely new approach to topical songwriting, as evidenced by the ripped from the headlines approach of “Day In the Life” or “Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite.” So much more could be said about the seminal quality of this record, but as it pertains to the topic at hand, this is a subject to be explored in later posts.

The White Album. Why this record in particular? My choice stems from the stylistic eclecticism of the song selections. This record was made at time when the band was beginning to show signs of cracking. Tensions were high. The fierce competition and one-upmanship between Lennon and McCartney that previously fueled a collaborative songwriting partnership began to implode. No longer was this competition a spark towards collaborative creativity. It instead gave way to a splintering between songwriters and created an atmosphere of individual rather than collaborative output.

For this reason, the White Album is a schizophrenic record, so stylistically varied as to present what seems at first listen to be a disjointed collection of songs written in a vacuum. It’s almost as if the four members had made solo records and at the last minute decided to release them as one behemoth collection of individual creativity. But with repeated listenings, one can reconcile and appreciate it’s stylistic variety by virtue of its remarkable scope. We’ve got arguably the first heavy metal song (“Helter Skelter”) playing alongside the western balladry of “Rocky Raccoon”; the plaintive psychedelia of “Dear Prudence” going head to head with the weird and edgy “Happiness is a Warm Gun”; and terribly sad songs of loss such as “Julia” next to the joyful reverie of “Birthday” and “Back in the U.S.S.R.”  The variety of structure, style and arrangement is dizzying. It’s a challenging record, one that requires the listener to put aside expectations of continuity and learn to regard it as a musical menagerie never topped before or since.

So how does this sit with you, dear reader? What would you choose? Let the debate continue…

Beatles White Album Portraits on Maunet

  1. Sunday 07.14.2013 | 5:35 EDT

    Robert dene says:

    John Lennon said that Ticket To Ride was the first heavy metal song…

  2. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:28 EDT

    KPH says:

    I was gonna say Zeppelin II.

    1. Thursday 03.14.2013 | 4:32 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      funny you should mention it. As an offshoot to this conversation, Knight and I today discussed which Zeppelin album was the best. I was torn between II and Houses of the Holy. I eventually landed on HotH – this was the record where they abandoned blatant nods to the blues structure and offered a collection of songs that were entirely new and fresh.

/ feb 2013

Vinyl Addiction by the Numbers:
Or, How to Kill a Chilly Saturday Afternoon

Vinyl Count Distribution Chart

 

Music geeks are obsessive catalogers. Their enjoyment of music is not limited to the recording itself, but to the metadata associated with one’s collection. The digital age makes that data readily accessible (if the geek is obsessive enough to tag his tracks with complete, accurate information). Digital music libraries like iTunes allow one to quickly glimpse a variety of data sets that heighten musical enjoyment. How many albums do I own? How many artists represent that number? What year did a particular album come out? Numbers give the music geek both a road map to his/her collection and a sense of the historical perspective the collection represents.

I am a music geek. I revel in the huge collection of music I’ve amassed over the past 30 years. And, with the help of iTunes, I routinely sort, filter and catalogue my collection by almost any criteria I could want. I can quickly refine my choices to find just the right record to listen to for any given mood or occasion. But on Feb 7, 2011 something happened that put a virtual stop to my digital musical consumption. I caught the vinyl bug.

vinyl

I purchased a Pro-ject Debut III Turntable and, with the fervor of a fanatic, began acquiring used, new and re-issued vinyl by the scores. Week after week, empty LP cartons stacked up outside my door while upstairs in my office the number of precious pieces of finely-grooved plastic grew at an alarming rate. I was hooked.

But my obsession eventually ran beyond just the consumption of vinyl. I jonesed for the metadata, you see. How many records had I acquired in the past 2 years? Where was my road map? I began toying with the idea of arranging my collection by decade (genre being a category that is too often blurry and subjective). This would give me at least one precious piece of information that could help me in selecting what to listen to when I was in the mood for, say, romantic pop with a penchant for keyboards. To the 80′s bin, Robin! And I began to wonder: Hmmm… how well is each decade represented by my collection?

I mentioned this whimsical musing to Rachel on several occasions. Each time, my extremely good-tempered wife-to-be answered with a cringing retort: I am not spending hours helping you shuffle pieces of vinyl around your office. And besides, I’ll never be able to find anything! So I gave up the dream. For the moment. Until one morning, as we lay in bed on a cold Brooklyn Saturday morning, I mentioned my irrepressible desire once again. This time, she formulated an interesting alternative: Why don’t you instead create an index of all your records, listed by decade? Brilliant! Create my own set of metadata the old fashioned way. By hand. Sort of. Will you help me, I pleaded? I was excited by the idea for reasons beyond anything a rational middle-aged man should ponder. But, with an air of peculiar excitement of her own, Rachel agreed to help. You see, she’s a geek too. A spreadsheet geek.

We hopped out of the warm bed, made some strong coffee and blew off the household chores of laundry and grocery shopping. Instead, Rachel took her position behind the Mac, nimble fingers at the ready, as I knelt beside one of the eight bins of vinyl scattered and stacked around the office. One by one, I pulled each record from it’s alphabetical position and dictated artist, album title and year to my lovely and patient geek at arms. It seemed a formidable task. But we flew through it. In less than 4 hours, we’d created a spreadsheet of all 456 records in my collection. Ah, that number. So satisfying. So frightening in it’s size-to-time ratio. But once the data was properly sorted, the real value of it (to me at least) shone through. I knew exactly how many records I had from each decade since 1920.

I had speculated on the spread as we endeavored in this somewhat ridiculous task. At the end of the day, my speculations proved correct. I am a child of the 80′s. My collection confirmed this. I had by far more records from that decade than any other, followed closely by the 1970′s. The 90′s (the decade dominated by the CD format) were the most anemically represented –  many titles were simply not pressed on vinyl during that time. And while the 2010′s represented only 7% of my collection, we are merely two years in to the decade. At the current average rate of growth of 15 records per year, I will theoretically have collected 150 by decade’s end!

Many will exclaim: What a colossal waste of time! And they may be right. But for reasons incomprehensible to the non-geek, it was a great way to kill a cold winter day. Rachel confirms it. This is a truly satisfying collection of data.

View the discography spreadsheet here.

Some have asked, what are the top ten artists in this vinyl collection? We are here to serve:

  1. The Rolling Stones: 21
  2. The Beatles: 18 
  3. Bob Dylan: 13
  4. Rush: 9
  5. Elvis Costello: 8
  6. Lou Reed: 8
  7. U2: 8
  8. Belle & Sebastian: 7
  9. The National: 7
  10. The Smiths: 7

For more interesting (?) statistics on digital music play count, visit my LastFM chart page.

vinyl-smiths

vinyl-stones

vinyl-orofon

vinyl-national

vinyl-national-2

  1. Wednesday 03.20.2013 | 12:12 EDT

    ultravioletray says:

    Nice! We have our vinyl collection organized by year, and use Discogs for indexing, though methinks yr spreadsheet might be easier to customize listings for more detailed stats.

    +1 for at least one Gordon Lightfoot LP in collection.

    +1 for Hatful of Hollow on vinyl.

    (Sticky Fingers with zipper is obvious +1, but then, I just gave it one).

  2. Friday 03.15.2013 | 10:33 EDT

    mpowers says:

    A compulsive activity near and dear to my heart.

    Quick suggestion.

    Don’t anticipate that your wife will appreciate your expert weighted index based on the “bands for mans” versus “bands for womans” as much as you do.

  3. Tuesday 02.05.2013 | 1:29 EDT

    benproof says:

    Rush. Ughh. That being said,..I’m glad you guys enjoyed geeking out together. The couple that geeks together,…well,..you get it.

  4. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:47 EDT

    rachel says:

    At least Led Zeppelin didn’t make the top 10. Then we’d have some reckoning to do.

    1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:49 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      They’re in the top 15

      1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:52 EDT

        rachel says:

        Don’t test my goodwill. And thank GOD you don’t have any Gordon Lightfoot on vinyl!

        1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 2:00 EDT

          chairmanmau says:

          Touché, my dear. Touché.

          1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 7:23 EDT

            KBJr says:

            But…’If You Could Read My Mind’ ‘Sundown’ and ‘The Wreck of the Sigmund Fitzgerard’ are fantastic vinyl songs!

  5. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:06 EDT

    KBJr says:

    The biggest surprise to me? More Rush records than Elvis Costello. Well-writ, and great pics!

    1. Monday 02.04.2013 | 1:19 EDT

      chairmanmau says:

      Yes, we’ll have to remedy that. Let’s recall this collection goes back to well before high school. Wait a minute. What am i apologizing for. Rush Rules!

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